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1897 Concert Moscow 15-03-1897.

The House of the Unions (also called Palace of 'the Unions) is a historical building in the Tverskoy District in central Moscow, Russia. It is situated on the corner of Bolshaya Dmitrovka and Okhotny Ryad streets. The House of Unions building (earlier Assembly of the Nobility) appeared in Moscow no later than 1755 and was built for the Moscow assembly of the nobility by M.F. Kazakov.

1895-1903 Hall of the Nobles.

The fist building on this location was constructed in the early 1770s, and originally belonged to Moscow Governor General Vasily Dolgorukov-Krymsky. In 1784 it was purchased by the Moscow Assembly of the Nobility (Благородное собрание) to serve as a Ball venue for the Russian nobility.

The structure was built in the classical style created for Prince V.M. Dolgoruky-Krymsky but in 1784 his estate was acquired by the Moscow Assembly of the Nobility as a place to hold balls and public functions.

In 1784-1790 Kazakov conducted reconstruction of the building, significantly expanding it and changing the layout. In the place of the interior courtyard he put a colonnaded hall with a marble statue of Ekaterina II. After the fire of 1812, the building was resurrected by the architect A.N. Bakarev.

In 1903-1908 A.F. Meyser conducted major reconstruction, drastically changing the proportions of the building's façade and using the techniques of 18th century classicism.

Hall of the Nobles.

Hall of the Nobles.

Hall of the Nobles.

Hall of the Nobles.

Hall of the Nobles.

Hall of the Nobles.

Pillar Hall

Between 1784 and 1787 the original building was redesigned and rebuilt by Russian architect Matvey Kazakov. In particular, Kazakov added the monumental Pillar Hall (Колонный зал) in place of the interior courtyard of the building. The hall was named after 28 internal Corinthian columns, all wood with white faux marble finish.

Hall of the Nobles.

In 1860 Russian Musical Society began a tradition of symphony concerts in the Pillar Hall. Their organizer and conductor was Nikolai Rubinstein. Today the building's appearance is still very close to Kazakov's original, despite numerous exterior alterations (the last of which was made in 1903-1908).