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Concert halls in Amsterdam around 1880

Amsterdam Odeon

  • Built: 1662.
  • Address: Singel 460, Amsterdam.
  • Merchant's house, received a cultural destination in the 19th century.
  • Visitors: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
  • Burned down in 1990. Re-opened 2015.

Amsterdam Odeon.

Amsterdam Oude Schouwburg (Old Theater)

  • Built: 1774.
  • Address: Leidseplein, Amsterdam.
  • This building was entirely made of wood.
  • On his last visit to Amsterdam in 1885 Brahms took the Hoforkest van Meiningen to show how it should be done (the perfectionist Von Bülow conducted Symphony No. 4).
  • Visitors: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)Hans von Bulow (1830-1894)
  • Burned down in 1890.

Amsterdam Oude Schouwburg (Old Theater), Leidseplein.

Amsterdam Felix Meritis

  • Built: 1788.
  • Address: Keizersgracht 324, Amsterdam.
  • The oval concert hall was Amsterdam's most important music hall until well into the 19th century and enjoyed a great international reputation.
  • The Ninth Symphony by Beethoven and the Symphonie fantastique by Berlioz were played for the first time in the concert hall of Felix Meritis.
  • The small hall of the Concertgebouw is inspired by this room.
  • On 26-01-1884, almost a year after Wagner's death, the first concert of the Amsterdam Wagner Society took place in the Felix Meritis building.
  • The society was dissolved in 1888.
  • Visitors: Robert Schumann (1810-1856), Clara Schumann, Camille Saint-Saens (1835-1921)Johannes Brahms (1833-1897), Julius Rontgen. The sister-in-law (and first lover) of Mozart, Aloysia Lange-Weber, sang there, a few years after Mozart's death (1798).
  • Rebuilding in 2015. Still exists.

Amsterdam Felix Meritis

Amsterdam Parkzaal (Park hall)

Amsterdam Parkzaal (Park hall)

Amsterdam Paleis voor Volksvlijt (Palace of Popular Diligence)

  • Built: Year 1864.
  • Address: Fredriksplein, Amsterdam.
  • The only hall that qualified in Amsterdam for the performance of orchestral music for the commissioning of the Amsterdam Royal Concertgebouw.
  • It was built to house a permanent exhibition of 'objects of folk industry and folk art'. Later the large concert hall was divided in two: one half functioned as a theater and the other half as a concert hall. because the concert hall of the Palace left something to be desired and there were hardly any facilities in the building for the public, the room was considered unsatisfactory.
  • Rehearsal by Brahms in 1884 of his Symphony No. 3 and Pianoconcerto No. 2 with a quarreling couple of unruly (Brahms: 'You are best people, but bad musicians').
  • Visitors: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
  • Burned down in 1929.

Amsterdam Paleis voor Volksvlijt (Palace of Popular Diligence)

Gebouw der Vrije Gemeente (Building of the Free Church)

  • Built: Year 1877.
  • Address: Weteringschans 6-8, Amsterdam. Near the Leidseplein.
  • The Vrije Gemeente is an originally modern-theological religious community, which originated in Amsterdam in 1877 when the brothers Ph. R. and P.H. Hugenholtz came from the Dutch Reformed Church and started their own congregation.
  • Now stage for popmusic called Paradiso.
  • Visitors: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
  • Still exists.

Gebouw der Vrije Gemeente (Building of the Free Church) 1/3.

Gebouw der Vrije Gemeente (Building of the Free Church) 2/3.

Gebouw der Vrije Gemeente (Building of the Free Church) 3/3.

Amsterdam Royal Concertgebouw (Concert Building)

  • Built: Year 1888.
  • Opening: 11-04-1888. Six years after the first plans.
  • Established in 1882 by de Naamlooze Vennootschap Het Concertgebouw (Public Company The Concertgebouw).
  • Due to the lack of good accommodation for the symphonic music in Amsterdam around 1880.
  • No orchestra at the time.
  • See Amsterdam Royal Concertgebouw.

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