Gustav-Mahler.eu
  • Year 1887.
  • 25-07-1886 until 01-02-1887.
  • Gottschedstrasse 4 (now No. 25).
  • Second floor.

Year 18871886-1887 House Gustav Mahler Leipzig - Gottschedstrasse No. 4 II.

1886-1887 House Gustav Mahler Leipzig - Gottschedstrasse No. 4.

1886-1887 House Gustav Mahler Leipzig - Gottschedstrasse No. 4.

1886-1887 House Gustav Mahler Leipzig - Gottschedstrasse No. 4.

1886-1887 House Gustav Mahler Leipzig - Gottschedstrasse No. 4.

1886-1887 House Gustav Mahler Leipzig - Gottschedstrasse No. 4.

1886-1887 House Gustav Mahler Leipzig - Gottschedstrasse No. 4.

Site of Gottschedstraße Synagogue (liberal synagogue)

The synagogue in the Gottschedstraße was designed by Otto Simonson, a student of the architect Gottfried Semper, and seated 2,000 worshippers.

At its consecration in 1855, music by Salomon Jadassohn was performed, who began his long tenure as choirmaster of the Tempel ten years later. In contrast to orthodox Judaism, this liberal synagogue's choir comprised both male and female voices and even included many non-Jews. The inclusion of an organ (built by Ladegast in 1868) in the musical contribution to worship was also in accordance with reformed Jewish tradition.

Three cantors of the Gottschedstraße Synagogue are of particular note: Rafael Frank, Max Jaffé and Samuel Lampel. After arriving in Leipzig in 1903, Frank was prodigiously active in the most diverse fields. Today he is remembered predominantly for his work on the development of Hebraic fonts ("Frank-Rühl-Hebrew"). Both Jaffé and Lampel entered the Synagogue's service in 1914. Alongside their cantor duties, both men taught at the Ephraim Carlebach School. In 1928, Lampel (appointed Senior Cantor of the Synagogue one year earlier) published a highly esteemed anthology entitled Kol Sch'muel (The Voice of Samuel), comprising 57 compositions and arrangements for the Sabbath and Festive Liturgy.

The Tempel was destroyed in the early hours of 10th November 1938. Following the deportation of both of the community's rabbis, Lampel assumed this office. From 1939, services were able to be held at the salvaged synagogue in the Keilstraße, until this too was closed in 1942. In the same year, both Lampel and Jaffé were deported and are believed to have been killed in an extermination camp shortly afterwards.

The Synagogue's choirmaster from the year 1924 was Barnet Licht, who played an influential role in the Jewish Cultural Alliance during the years of the Nazi regime, subsequently surviving internment in the Theresienstadt ghetto.