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Daniel Beddoe (1863-1937).

  • Profession: Tenor.
  • Relation to Mahler: Worked with Gustav Mahler.
  • Correspondence with Mahler:
  • Born: 16-03-1863 Aberdare, Wales.
  • Died: 26-12-1937 New York, America. Aged 74.
  • Buried: 00-00-0000
  1. 1909 Concert New York 06-04-1909.
  2. 1910 Concert New York 01-04-1910.
  3. 1910 Concert New York 02-04-1910.

Dan Beddoe. 

A Cincinnati Enquirer review of a May 1931 performance stated that he "stole the show with voice clear and ringing" with "countless" calls for encores and "with the entire audience of many thousands rising en masse to pay him special tribute."

Daniel Beddoe (1863-1937).

21-08-1909 Welsh paper: Daniel Beddoe Visits the Rhondda. It is with the greatest of pleasure that we welcome back to the land of his birth Mr. Daniel Beddoe, the great tenor singer, whose in the American musical world is a sine qua non. It is 21 years since Mr. Beddoe last set his foot in Wales, and in the meantime he has been making a name for himself as, according to the American Press, No American tenor in recent years has so completely monopolised the oratorio and concert field as Daniel Beddoe." Mr. Beddoe was born in Penygraig, and even when quite a young fellow. Working in the mine he was fortunate enough to win at several Nationals. He had a voice then, but, as he told the boys of the Mid-Rhondda Orpheus Glee Society on Wednesday evening last, he had had to work hard to attain the eminence he now holds. You must get to understand the author's meaning, and temper that with (tipping his forehead) a little intelligence." Mr. Beddoe has appeared in most of the important New York oratorio performances, such as "Judas Maccabeus!Dream of Gerontius," Apostles," and many others.

Mr. Beddoe's success at the last Cincinnati Festival, May, 1908, when he sang the leading tenor parte in Bach's Passion Music," the Children's Crusade," and other important works, was so overwhelming, that the great tenor was at once re-engaged for the next Cincinnati Music Festival of May, 1910. It will be a great pity, and indeed a loss for the Rhondda not to have an opportunity of hearing Mr. Beddoe sing in a public concert before he returns to the land of his adoption. Possibly our worthy Male Voice Party conductor, Mr. Emrys Richards, might take the hint, and would arrange a concert in conjunction with the Mid-Rhondda. Orpheus Glee Society?

A December 1931 New York Evening Post article, recalling his singing in the Messiah and the Elijah for the Oratorio Society of New York, noted that he had "been singing for a generation" since his first appearance there in 1903 and described  how he was "in marvelous voice and received a standing ovation after each aria he sang. A New York Times review of the same performance noted that "For Dan Beddoe it was the fortieth year of public appearance. He has become almost indispensable to the Society's performances of the Messiah. The 64-year-old tenor sang as always in keeping with the spirit of the work and with fine musicianship. Age does not stale the many resources of his art."

A Cincinnati Enquirer review of a May 1931 performance stated that he "stole the show with voice clear and ringing" with "countless" calls for encores and "with the entire audience of many thousands rising en masse to pay him special tribute."

A December 1931 New York Evening Post article, recalling his singing in the Messiah and the Elijah for the Oratorio Society of New York, noted that he had "been singing for a generation" since his first appearance there in 1903 and described  how he was "in marvelous voice and received a standing ovation after each aria he sang.

A New York Times review of the same performance noted that "For Dan Beddoe it was the fortieth year of public appearance. He has become almost indispensable to the Society's performances of the Messiah. The 64-year-old tenor sang as always in keeping with the spirit of the work and with fine musicianship. Age does not stale the many resources of his art."

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